All BGRI Abstracts

Displaying 81 - 90 of 416 records | 9 of 42 pages

Genetic variability in bread wheat (Triticum Aestivum L. ) accessions using functional and random DNA Markers

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Kachalla Kyari Mala Lake Chad Research Institute, Maiduguri, Borno State-Nigeria
Dattijo Aminu, Zakari Goji Silas Turaki, Fatima Henkrar, Udupa Sripada

The research was conducted at ICARDA, Rabat. Twenty-four accessions were obtained from LCRI for marker analysis. Wizard Genomic DNA Purification Kit was used for DNA extraction. DNA was extracted by CTAB method and quantified using 1.0 % (w/v) agarose gels. Total of 12 loci, 5 functional and 7 linked random DNA markers to the traits of interest were used. PowerMarker and DARwin software were used to calculate the No. of alleles and values of genetic diversity, PIC, genetic distance, and NJ dendrogram. The total No. of detected alleles was 39; and mean No. of alleles was 3.25. No. of alleles range from 1 (Dreb-B1) to 9 (Xgwm577). Genetic diversity index ranged from 0.0000 in Dreb-B1 to 0.8471 in Xgwm577. The PIC value was also varied from 0.0000 (Dreb-B1) to 0.8296 (Xgwm577). The frequency of biotic resistance linked random DNA marker allele at Xgwm144 and Xwmc44, associated with yellow and leaf rust gene was 25% each. Marker alleles Xgwm577 and Xgwm533 linked to Stb2 and Stb8 at 150 and 120bp have frequencies of 21 and 4%. The frequency of abiotic resistance showed 50% of accessions had 1R segment (1BL.1RS translocation) and 58% of accessions showed presence of 120bp allele of Xwmc89, associated with QTL for drought tolerant. Functional marker alleles of Dreb-B1 associated with drought tolerant genes showed alleles frequency in all accessions. Linked marker allele Xgwm111 linked to heat tolerant gene showed 17% allele frequency at 220bp. Rht1 and Rht2, the allele frequencies were 92 and 4%. 92% of the cultivars had photoperiod insensitive allele at Ppd-D1 locus. VrnA1a and VrnA1c primer pair amplified at 965, 876, and 484bp, allele frequency of 13 and 87%. Cluster analysis had grouped the accessions into 5 at a genetic distance level 0.15.

Tags:

Spreading of wheat yellow rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis West.) in the south of Russia in 2017

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Galina Vladimirovna Volkova All Russian Research Institute of Biological Plant Protection
Irina Petrovna Matveeva

Yellow rust caused by Puccinia striiformis West. is a harmful and dangerous disease in the south of Russia. Yield losses under optimum conditions on highly susceptible varieties can vary from 10 to 100%. During the growing season of 2017, cool weather with constant precipitation from the third decade of April to the first decade of June contributed to the intensive development of the pathogen. Surveys of the main winter wheat production areas in five agroclimatic zones of the region revealed that yellow rust was prevalent in all areas. The maximum development of P.striiformis was observed in southern submontane and western Priazovsky agroclimatic zones. Some varieties such as Grom, Yuka, Tanya, Anka had losses to yellow rust of up to 30-40 %. In the central and northern agroclimatic zones, the losses averaged 5%, whereas in the dry eastern steppe zone losses were only up to 1%. The build up of yellow rust inoculum in the region raises concerns that in 2018, under favorable weather conditions in spring, winter wheat crops could be infected with the disease, especially in the wetter agroclimatic zones.

Tags:

Accelerated Cloning and Characterization of Adult Plant Resistance Genes in Wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Sreya Ghosh John Innes Centre
Burkhard,Steuernagel, Caixia, Lan, Miroslava, Karafi?tov?, Ksenia, Krasileva, Jaroslav, Dole?el, Evans, Lagudah, Ravi, Singh, Brande, Wulff, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Adult Plant Resistance (APR) genes are broad-spectrum, partial-resistance genes that have the potential to contribute to sustainable control of wheat rust diseases. However, their isolation and characterization are complicated by the lack of precise molecular markers required for their identification, and therefore their use in plant breeding programs has been limited. Recent developments including the falling cost of sequencing and the increasing use of sequence capture methods to reduce genome complexity have enabled previously intractable methods such as mutational genomics to clone genes in wheat. Despite their increasing ease of use, many of these approaches require prior knowledge of the gene space and, in some cases, the gene family of the target gene to be cloned. As the APRs cloned so far do not belong to any common gene family, it is not possible to use general features of these identified APRs to conduct biased searches for novel APRs. This project aims to use an unbiased gene isolation technique called MutChromSeq, which combines chromosome flow-sorting and mutational genomics, and is independent of fine mapping, to rapidly clone the recently discovered APR gene Lr68 (Leaf Rust 68). Cloning APRs allows breeders to trace genes cheaply and quickly using gene-specific markers, enabling them to build effective and durable resistance gene pyramids. It also allows us to elucidate any common mechanism of action they have, helping researchers and breeders understand better the basis of their durable resistance. At the same time, the generation time of wheat has become one of the major limiting factors for the response time of breeders to rust epidemics. Thus, this project also aims to combine marker-assisted selection with accelerated generation advancement ('speed breeding') for rapid germplasm structuring and field performance evaluation.

Tags:

Harnessing the predictive power of epidemiological modelling for wheat yellow rust disease

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Vanessa Bueno-Sancho John Innes Centre
Christopher,Judge, Francesca, Minter, Nik, Cunniffe, Richard, Morris, Diane, Saunders, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wheat yellow rust is a disease caused by the fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp tritici (PST) that is a significant threat to wheat production worldwide. Recently, a novel approach called "Field Pathogenomics" was developed that allows acquisition of genotypic data from field samples of PST-infected wheat. This has enabled us to study the re-emergence of this pathogen in the UK and understand the different races that form the current PST population. However, the dynamics of pathogen transmission and dispersal still remain unknown and understanding this is essential for designing effective surveillance. The objective of this project is to develop a spatially-explicit model for the spread of PST that can contribute to better management of the disease and be used as a warning system for wheat yellow rust infection in the UK. The first aim is to study how PST spreads at the field level and determine whether there are differences between PST races in terms of disease dynamics. To this end, a set of markers have been designed that can be used to genotype field-collected isolates and determine which race they belong to. Field trials were also undertaken across the UK using wheat varieties that are known to be susceptible to the disease, with PST-infected wheat samples collected during the 2015-2016 and 2016-2017 seasons. These samples will be genotyped to study the prevalence of different PST races and determine whether PST genotypes identified early in the season are predictive of dominant genotypes found later in the season. Understanding PST dynamics within a field is key to build an epidemiological model that can predict how this disease behaves. This would improve disease management, targeting of chemical sprays and optimize pathogen surveillance.

Tags:

Breeding of high yielding, rusts resistance and Zn-enriched wheat varieties for different agro-ecological zones of Pakistan

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Maqsood Qamar Wheat Program, National Agricultural Research Center (NARC) Islamabad
Sikander Khan Tanveer, Muhammad Sohail, Muhammad Shahzad Ahmed, Sayed H. Abbass, Sundas Wagar, Atiq Rattu, Muhammad Imtiaz

Wheat plays a vital role in multifaceted farming system of Pakistan. Like other many other countries, Pakistan's sustainable wheat production is also continuously threatened by a number of biotic and abiotic stresses. Among the biotic stresses, three rust diseases of wheat have been the most devastating. Stem rust was effectively controlled with adoption of the semi-dwarf spring wheats of the Green Revolution. However, the threat of the evolution of Ug99 race of stem rust in East Africa and its migration to Iran cannot be neglected. The Chance of of Ug99 migrating from Iran into Pakistan, coupled with the presence of dangerous new races of stripe and leaf rusts invites enormous efforts for development of rust resistant varieties for sustainable production of the wheat in the country. In this regard the Wheat Program, NARC, Pakistan initiated an intensive breeding program with financial and technical support of USDA and CIMMYT. Diverse sources of resistance to the three rusts particularly to the stem rust race Ug99 were introduced from CIMMYT. Through the rigorous selection procedure, four rusts resistant wheat varieties (NARC 2011, Pakistan 2013, Zincol 2016 and Borlaug 2016) have been released. These varieties are also resistant to Ug99. The varieties i.e. NARC 2011, Borlaug 2016 and Zincol 2016 are performing well in irrigated areas whereas Pakistan 2013 is suitable for rainfed conditions. The variety Zincol 2016 has high Zn content (35 ppm) in grain as compared to national standard check variety (25 ppm). These varieties are not only higher yielding but also possess good grain quality and other desirable traits. A considerable quantity of seed of the varieties is already present in the national seed system and will reduce the risk of Ug99 threat.

Tags:

A new warrior race of Puccinia striiformis f.sp tritici in Syria

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mohammad Kassem Aleppo University, Aleppo , Syria
Bassam,Souliman, Naem, Al-Housien, Mohammad Shafick, Hakiem, Miloudi.M, Nachit, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wheat yellow rust, caused by Puccinia triticina f. sp. tritici, is the major problem in wheat production in most parts of West Asia. Monitoring of the pathogen virulence factors and their changes provides basic information for the development of an early warning system. Wheat yellow rust has become increasingly important in the Syrian central and coastal areas during the last three years, The objective of this study was to identify races of the pathogen. Yellow rust samples collected at sites in the central and the coastal plains, were analyzed on differential host genotypes with known seedling resistance genes. According to the results of race determination, races 230E150, 166E150, 230E142 and 462E128 were identified. The race 462E128 designated the Warrior race, was identified at several sites across the Syrian central plains at the end of the 2017 growing season (early and Mid-May) when yellow rust exploded suddenly on a number of varieties, despite their previous high resistance ratings. The infections rapidly reached significant levels, in spite of the high temperature (up to 33?C) and the absence of rainfall or irrigation. This new virulent race (462E128) has been able to attack wheat lines with several major resistance gene(s) including: Spaldings Prolific (SP), Yr 3+4, Triticum spelta (Yr5), which remained effective until 2016 in Syria, Virulence to lthe resistance genes Yr1, Yr2, Yr2+, Yr3V, Yr3ND, Yr4+, Yr6, Yr6+, Yr7, Yr7+, Yr9, Yr9+, Yr11, Yr12, Yr18, Yr24, Yr26 Spaldings Prolific (YrSP), Anza (YrA+) Spaldings Prolific (SP), Yr 3+4, Triticum spelta (Yr5) and Selkirk (YrSK) was also found. Virulence to Carstens V (CV), Yr 15/6* Avocet S and Yr 5/6* Avocet S; was not found. According to our findings, the Warrior race has increased in frequency within the mix of yellow rust races in these areas in Syria . It is expected that the Warrior yellow rust race will cause damage on resistant wheat cultivars in 2018.

Tags:

New QTL for leaf rust and stripe rust resistance in four bread wheat and two durum wheat mapping populations

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Caixia Lan CIMMYT
Ravi,Singh, Julio, Huerta-Espino, Mandeep, Randhawa, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wheat leaf rust (LR) and stripe rust (YR), caused by the air-borne fungi Puccinia triticina (Pt) and Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), respectively, are considered the primary biotic threats to bread wheat and durum wheat production globally. Growing resistant wheat varieties is a key method of minimizing the extent of yield losses caused by these diseases. Bread wheat lines Francolin #1, Kenya Kongoni, Kundan and Sujata, and CIMMYT-derived durum wheat lines Bairds and Dunkler display an adequate level of adult plant resistance (APR) to both leaf rust and stripe rust in Mexican field environments. Six recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations developed from crosses Avocet/Francolin #1, Avocet/Kenya Kongoni, Avocet/Kundan, Avocet/Sujata, Atred#1/Bairds and Atred#1/Dunkler were phenotyped for leaf rust response at Ciudad Obregon, Mexico, and the bread wheat populations for stripe rust response at Toluca for under artificial inoculations for multiple seasons. The RIL populations and their parents were genotyped with the 50 K diversity arrays technology (DArT) sequence system and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Known pleotropic APR genes Lr46/Yr29 mapped in all of six populations, and explained 7.4-65.1% and 7.7-66.1% severity variations for LR and YR across different bread wheat populations and accounted for 12.4-60.8% of LR severity variations over two durum wheat populations. In addition, several new APR loci identified on chromosomes 1AS, 1DS, 2BS, 2BL, 3D and 7BL in bread wheat and QTL on chromosome 6BL in durum wheat. Among these loci, QTL on chromosomes 1AS, 3D and 7BL might be represent new co-located/pleotropic loci conferring APR to LR and YR. RILs combining these APR loci can be used as sources of complex APR in both bread wheat and durum wheat breeding. In addition, the closely linked single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have been converted into breeder-friendly kompetitive allele specific PCR (KASP) markers and their diagnostic verified.

Tags:

Virulence evolution of Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici on wheat in Kenya between 1970 to 1992 and 2009 to 2014

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Mercy Wamalwa Egerton University Njoro, Kenya
Ruth Wanyera, James Owuoche, Julian Rodriguez, Annemarie Justesen, Lesley Lesley, Sridhar Bhavani, Cristobal Uauy, Mogens Hovmøller

Emergence of new virulent races of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) to stripe (yellow) rust resistance genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has historically resulted in severe yield losses worldwide. We conducted a study to characterize the virulence profiles of Pst races prevalent in Kenya from historic (1970-1992) and recent collections (2009-2014). Pst isolates collected during surveys in Kenya were characterized at the Global Rust Research Centre (GRRC), Denmark. Yellow rust differential sets (wheat lines with known Yr resistance genes), and strain-specific sequence-characterized-amplified-region (SCAR) markers were used to group the Pst isolates as Pst1 or Pst2. Virulence to Yr1, Yr2, Yr3,Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr9, Yr17, Yr25, Yr27, and the seedling resistance in AvocetS were detected. A total of 12 virulence profiles /races were detected in isolates obtained during 1970 to 1992, while six races were detected from samples collected between 2009 to 2014. In both periods, races with virulence profiles Yr2, Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr25, Yr27, Avs and Yr2, Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr17, Yr25, AvS were common. The SCAR results revealed that both Pst1 and Pst2 strains were present in the Pst isolates tested, Pst1 even in isolates from the 1970s. Additional isolates were also identified with neither Pst1 nor Pst2 profiles. From our findings, race analysis is key to understand the race diversity and pre-breeding efforts for effective resistance gene deployment.

Tags:

Gender Differences in Adoption of Improved Wheat Variety Technology in Kenya.

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
ANNE GICHANGI KENYA AGRICULTURAL AND LIVESTOCK RESEARCH ORGANIZATION (KALRO)
Godwin Macharia, Bernice Ngina

Studies have shown that women farmers are worse off than the male counterparts in terms of adoption of improved varietal technology and hence they experience low productivity. This technology adoption gender gap affects agricultural development considering that women in Kenya play a significant role in agriculture and food production. The link between gender and adoption is likely to vary across cultures and over time. The hypothesis of significant gender differences in access to and use of productive resources and adoption of improved wheat varieties was tested. Based on bivariate analysis, significant differences in access and use of productive resources between men and women farmers were observed. Men were more likely to access credit, extension services, own and cultivate more lands compared to women. Similarly, women in female-headed households were less likely to access the productive resources compared to women in male-headed households. The factors that affect adoption of improved wheat varieties among smallholder farmers were analysed with a specific focus on women. In contrast to the conventional model of using gender of the household head, gender and plot levels analyses were conducted. The results show that the gender of the field owner had a negative effect on adoption of improved wheat varieties. This indicates that, men were more likely to adopt improved wheat varieties, compared to women farmers. Moreover, the level of education of the household head, household size, and access to credit and extension services were observed to significantly increase the likelihood of farmers adopting improved wheat varieties. In the same framework, female farmers in male-headed households who had access to credit were more likely to adopt improved wheat varieties while there was greater probability of adoption of improved wheat varieties among female farmers in female-headed households who had access to agriculture extension and belonged to a farmer organization

Tags:

Resistance to race TKTTF of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici with virulence to SrTmp gene in Ethiopian bread wheat lines

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Worku Bulbula Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research
Ashenafi Gemechu, Habtamu Tesfaye, Zerihun Tadesse, Habtemariam Zegeye, Netsanet Bacha, Ayele Badebo, Bekele Abeyo, Pablo Olivera, Matthew, Rouse

Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) is the major wheat production constraint in Ethiopia causing recurrent epidemics that resulted in the withdrawal of widely grown wheat cultivars from production. Among the current Pgt races detected in Ethiopia, TKTTF is the most frequent and has caused a severe epidemic in the south wheat growing regions (Bale and Arsi) after its first detection in 2012. Therefore, to avert the current situation, identifying sources of resistance to race TKTTF in breeding germplasm is a top priority to the National Wheat Breeding Program. Hence, 82 promising bread wheat lines including five check cultivars were evaluated in Debre Zeit in a TKTTF single race nursery for three consecutive seasons, 2014-2016. Ethiopian bread wheat cultivar Digalu was used as a spreader row and was inoculated using a single isolate of race TKTTF at different growth stages. The nursery was bounded by oat to reduce interference with any other stem rust race. The 82 lines were tested in the greenhouse at Cereal Disease Laboratory and were also tested with known diagnostic molecular markers. Twenty-nine lines displayed low levels of terminal stem rust severity in the field and low coefficient of infections. Fourty-one lines were resistant to race TKTTF at the seedling stage. Bread wheat lines resistant to TKTTF are valuable sources of resistance that can be deployed in wheat growing regions of Ethiopia prone to stem rust.

Tags:

Pages