All BGRI Abstracts

Displaying 71 - 80 of 197 records | 8 of 20 pages

Nutrient uptake in rust fungi: How sweet is parasitic life?

BGRI 2010 Plenary Abstract
Ralf T. Voegele Fachgebiet Phytopathologie, Institut für Phytomedizin, Fakultät Agrarwissenschaften, Germany
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A better understanding of the fundamental principles of host-pathogen interactions should enable us to develop new strategies to control disease and to eliminate or at least manage their causative agents. This is especially true for obligate biotrophic parasites like the rust fungi. One vital aspect in the field of obligate biotrophic host-pathogen interactions is the mobilization, acquisition and metabolism of nutrients by the pathogen. This includes transporters necessary for the uptake of nutrients as well as enzymes necessary for their mobilization and metabolism. In a broader sense effector molecules reprogramming the host or triggering the infected cell into metabolic shifts favorable for the pathogen also play an important role in pathogen alimentation.

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Role of Berberis spp. as alternate hosts in generating new races of Puccinia graminis and P. striiformis

BGRI 2010 Plenary Abstract
Yue Jin USDA-ARS, Cereal Disease Laboratory
View jin_2010.pdf (189.43 KB)

The common barberry and several other Berberis spp. serve as the alternate hosts to two important rust pathogens of small grains and grasses, Puccinia graminis and P. striiformis. Barberry eradication has been practiced for centuries as a means to control stem rust. Diverse virulence variations have been observed in populations of P. graminis f. sp. tritici that were associated with susceptible barberries in North America. Barberry likely has played a role in generating new races of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici in some regions in the world. Several North American stem rust races, namely races 56, 15B and QCC, initially originated from barberry, were subsequently responsible for generating large-scale epidemics. Thus, sexual cycles on Berberis spp. may generate virulence combinations that could have serious consequences to cereal crop production.

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Characterization of two new wheat stem rust races within the Ug99 lineage in South Africa

BGRI 2010 Plenary Abstract
Botma Visser Department of Plant Sciences, University of the Free State, South Africa
View visser_2010.pdf (240.73 KB)

Two new races of the wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) stem rust pathogen, representing the fifth and sixth variants described within the Ug99 lineage, were detected in South Africa. Races TTKSP and PTKST (North American notation) were detected in 2007 and 2009, respectively. Except for Sr24 virulence, race TTKSP is phenotypically identical to TTKSF, a commonly detected race of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) in South Africa. PTKST is similar to TTKSP except that it produces a lower infection type on the Sr21 differential and has virulence for Sr31. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) analysis confirmed the genetic relationship amongst TTKSF, TTKSP, PTKST and TTKSK (Ug99). TTKSK, PTKST and TTKSF grouped together with 99% similarity, while sharing 88% genetic resemblance with TTKSP. These four races in turn shared only 31% similarity with other South African races. It is proposed that TTKSP arose locally as a single step mutation from race TTKSF, whereas PTKST probably represents an exotic introduction of Pgt to South Africa.

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Association mapping of rust resistance in pre-green revolution wheat accessions

BGRI 2010 Poster Abstract
Urmil Bansal The University of Sydney, Plant Breeding Institute, Australia

Association mapping detects correlations between genotypes and phenotypes in a sample of individuals based on the linkage disequilibrium and can be used to uncover new genetic variation among germplasm collections. Two hundred and five landraces collected by the English botanist A. Watkins in the 1920s were screened for rust response variation under field conditions during three crop seasons. An integrated map of 350 polymorphic DArT markers was developed. Association mapping identified the involvement of several genomic regions in controlling resistance to three rust diseases. Seven, eight and nine genomic regions, respectively, appeared to carry yet uncharacterized leaf rust, stripe rust and stem rust resistance. Three dimensional analyses indicated genetic association of leaf rust and stripe rust resistance in some accessions, whereas no such association was observed between stem rust resistance and resistance to either of the other two rust diseases. A new stripe rust resistance locus, Yr47, has been named. 

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Genetic map of stem rust resistant gene Sr35 in T. monococcum

BGRI 2010 Poster Abstract
W. Zhang Department of Plant Sciences, University of California-Davis, USA

With the TTKS family of races virulent on most genes currently providing protection against stem rust worldwide, identifying, mapping, and deploying resistance genes effective against these races has become critical.  We present here a genetic map of Sr35.  Both parents of our diploid mapping population (DV92/G3116, 142 SSD lines) are resistant to TTKSK, but the population segregates for resistance to TRTTF (Yemen) and RKQQC (US). Race analysis suggests that G3116 carries Sr21 and DV92 both Sr21 and Sr35.  Resistance to TRTTF and RKQQC was mapped to a 6 cM interval on chromosome 3AmL between markers BF483299 and CJ656351.  This interval corresponds to a 178-kb region in Brachypodium which contains only 16 annotated genes and exhibits a small inversion (including 2 genes) and a putative insertion (2 genes) relative to rice and sorghum.  This map contains closely-linked markers to Sr35 and provides the initial step for this gene's positional cloning.

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Surveillance and race analysis of stem rust in Kenya for the years 2008 and 2009

BGRI 2010 Poster Abstract
Ruth Wanyera KALRO-Njoro, Kenya

Limited but targeted stem rust race characterization was undertaken in Kenya in 2004 and 2005 which led to the detection of Ug99 present in Kenya and designation of Ug99 as race TTKS (based on North American stem rust race nomenclature system). Further surveillance in 2006 and 2007 detected variants of TTKS with virulence on Sr24 (TTKST) and Sr36 (TTTSK), respectively. Stem rust surveillance was undertaken at an extended level in 2008 and 2009 within predominant wheat growing regions of Kenya. Three hundred and sixty farms were surveyed from regional districts of Naivasha, Narok, Nakuru, Laikipia, Meru, Uasin-Gishu, Nandi, Elgeyo and Trans-Nzioa, during 2008 main season (May to September and December). The information from farmers indicated that more than 95% of these farms were sprayed with fungicides. Despite the use of fungicides, stem rust was detected in 67% of the surveyed farms. Stem rust ranged from trace amount -100% in severity with minimum infection in Naivasha district (40%) and maximum in Narok district (90%). Yellow rust was detected in 22% of the farms. Out of one hundred and twenty-six stem rust samples collected, 37 and 39 (a total of 76 ) samples were sent to Cereal Disease Laboratory (CDL) Minnesota, USA and Cereal Research Laboratory of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada respectively, for race typing using the respective differentials used by these labs. From the 39 collections sent to Canada, 17 (43%) survived, of which majority were typed to TTKST (65%) followed by TTKSK (18%), PTKST (12%) and mixture of TTKST and TTKSK (5%). The CDL typed vast majority of pathotypes as TTKSK (84%) followed by TTKST and TTTSK (7% each). The combined results of two labs indicated that predominant frequency in Kenya in 2008 was TTKSK (51%) followed by TTKST (31%), PTKST (6%) and TTTSK (6%). The frequency of TTKST significantly increased in 2008 compared to 2007 which is not surprising, given that Sr24 carrying wheat cultivar KS Mwamba is cultivated on large acreage in Kenya. In 2009, 262 farms were surveyed from regional districts of Narok, Laikipia, Nyandarua, Meru, Uasin-Gishu, Nandi, Elgeyo and Trans-Nzioa. The 2009 season experienced heavy drought in many areas. Nevertheless, stem rust was detected in 79% of the farms with disease severity ranging from trace to 100%. Yellow rust was detected in 15% of the farms. Stem rust infection ranged from 0 to 100% with minimum infection in Nyandarua (18%), Laikipia (42%) and maximum in Uasin-Gishu and Elgeyo (100% each). Out of seventy-four stem rust samples collected, 55 samples were sent to Canada for race typing. Only 20% of the samples survived, of which majority were typed to TTKST (50%), PTKST (34%) and PTKSK (16%). Borlaug Global Rust Initiative 2010 Technical Workshop / Poster Abstracts 7 The 2009 results did not depict real situation of predominance of pathogenic variability because of small sample size, however it provided fair indication that race TTKST is still the most prevalent. This information generated on the distribution of stem rust races, and the incidence of stem rust is important for anticipatory breeding and release of cultivars with effective sources of resistance in Kenya, and at same time mitigating global threat of stem rust by reducing intensity of stem rust inoculum in East Africa.

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Race nomenclature systems: Can we speak the same language?

BGRI 2009 Plenary Abstract
Tom Fetch AAFC, Canada
View fetch_2009.pdf (114.05 KB)

The first system describing physiologic specialization in the cereal rust fungi was that by Stakman and Levine (1922) for the wheat stem rust pathogen. Thirty seven biologic forms or “races” were identified using 12 differential wheat lines. Since then, additional variability in physiologic specialization was found and several systems evolved to describe this variation using numbers, letters, or combinations of both. This led to difficulties in comparing races, most often because of differences in the system that is used and the differential lines employed. A system that describes virulence succinctly and allows easilymade comparisons between races is highly desirable. Additionally, differential lines should be monogenic or near-isogenic so that virulence is classified on a genetic basis. Wherever near-isogenic stocks are used, it is vital that the recurrent parent is included. The systems that appear to be best suited to describing virulence with the above parameters are the letter-code and octal nomenclature. Of these, the letter-code system is the most commonly used based on a survey of research scientists working on stem rust. Thus, the letter-code system that uses 20 differential host lines is proposed to describe the nomenclature of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici on a worldwide basis. In addition, the source seedstock line for each differential gene is provided.

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Are rust pathogens under control in the Southern Cone of South America?

BGRI 2009 Plenary Abstract
Silvia German National Institute of Agricultural Research [INIA], Uruguay
View german_2009.pdf (238.77 KB)

Approximately nine million ha of wheat (Triticum aestivum and T. durum) were sown annually in the Southern Cone of South America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay) during 2003-2007. Presently, leaf rust (caused by Puccinia triticina) is the most important rust of wheat throughout the region. The pathogen population is extremely dynamic leading to short-lived resistance in commercial cultivars. Leaf rust management relies on the use of resistant cultivars and fungicides. Sources of adult plant resistance conferred by minor additive genes have been increasingly used in breeding programs to obtain cultivars with more durable resistance. Stripe rust (P. striiformis f. sp. tritici) is endemic in central and southern Chile, where fungicides are required to control the disease on susceptible cultivars. Stem rust (P. graminis f. sp. tritici) has not caused widespread epidemics in the last 25 years due to the use of resistant cultivars. Virulence to Sr24 and Sr31, the most important genes conferring resistance to local races, has not been reported in the region. The areas sown with cultivars susceptible to local races in Argentina and Uruguay have increased in recent years. Since most varieties sown in the region are susceptible to Ug99 or derived races, testing and selection for resistance in Kenya, facilitated by the Borlaug Global Rust Initiative, is highly relevant for research aimed at preventing epidemics, which may occur if these races migrate, or are accidentally introduced to our region. The resistances identified in east Africa will also contribute to increasing the levels of resistance to current local races.

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The development and application of near-isogenic lines for monitoring cereal rust pathogens

BGRI 2009 Plenary Abstract
Colin Wellings The University of Sydney, Plant Breeding Institute, Australia
View wellings_2009.pdf (174.99 KB)

The purpose of monitoring cereal rust pathogens is to provide a basis for disease control strategies that include breeding for resistance, predicting disease response in commercial cultivars and responding to the dynamics of pathogen change. The means of achieving this vary from regular collection surveys based on assessments of sample collections in greenhouse tests, to monitoring and recording static trap plots. Factors governing the method of approach include the size of the target region, the available research resources and the experience of staff involved. This paper is a brief review of the development of near-isogenic lines as a means of monitoring cereal rust pathogens. Emphasis will be given to wheat stripe/ yellow rust and the development and application of a near-isogenic set of materials based on the spring wheat cultivar Avocet. This parent was selected because of its high degree of susceptibility to the disease, agronomic adaptability (semidwarf, spring habit, moderate vernalisation and day-length requirements), and resistance to stem rust. The relative benefits of using these materials will be discussed in the context of available data.

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Progress and prospects in discovery and use of novel sources of stem rust resistance

BGRI 2009 Plenary Abstract
Yue Jin USDA-ARS, Cereal Disease Laboratory
View jin_2009.pdf (111.81 KB)

A number of stem rust resistance genes derived from wild relatives of wheat appeared to be more effective against race TTKSK (Ug99) of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici than Sr genes of wheat origin. In an attempt to identify sources of stem rust resistance genes effective against TTKSK, we evaluated several cultivated and wild relatives of wheat for resistance to TTKSK and other stem rust races with broad virulence in seedling tests. Preliminary results indicated that TTKSK resistance could readily be found, but frequencies of resistance varied among the species. Aegilops speltoides had the highest frequency of resistance (nearly 100%). Other species having high frequencies of TTKSK resistance included triticale (77.7% of 567 accessions), Triticum urartu (96.8% of 205 accessions), and T. monococcum (61% of 1020 accessions). Frequencies of TTKSK resistance in other species were: 14.7% in Ae. tauschii (456 accessions), 15% in T. timopheevii (298 accessions), and 17% in T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides (157 accessions). Based on specific infection types to several races, we postulated that novel genes for resistance to TTKSK are present in some of these species. Accessions with putatively new resistance genes were selected to develop crosses for introgressing resistance into wheat and for developing mapping populations.

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