All BGRI Abstracts

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A new durum (Triticum durum Desf.) wheat variety MACS 3949 developed for rich nutritional pasta quality with high zinc and iron

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Balgounda Honrao Agharakar Research Institute Pune
yashavanthakumar,Kakanur, Vijendra, Baviskar, Ajit, Chavan, Vilas, Surve, Vijay, Khade, Juned, Bagwan, Vitthal, Gite, Shrikant, Khairanar, Sameer, Raskar, Deepak, Bankar, Satish, Misra, , , , , , , ,

MACS 3949 is a durum wheat variety developed at Agharkar Research Institute, Pune derived through selection method from 39th IDYN (CIMMYT). The variety was identified by 55th All India Wheat and Barley workshop CCS HAU, Hissar and subsequently notified by Central Sub Committee on Crop Standards, India. On the basis of mean of three years (2013-14, 2014-15 and 2015-16) data from All India coordinated experiment, grain yield of MACS 3949 (43.98 q/ha) was higher to all the checks Viz., NIDW 295 (39.70 q/ha) and UAS 428 (41.78 q/ha). Overall, MACS 3949 showed a yield advantage of about 10.78 % over NIDW 295 and 5.24 % over UAS 428. The important morphological traits of the variety described as, semi dwarf with average plant height around 81 (78-83) cm, medium sized strong waxy semi erect green leaves, parallel dense spikes with long spreading awns. Grains were amber colored, bold lustrous, semi hard, elliptical in shape with short brush, soft threshing at maturity and1000-grain weight was about 47 (42-53) gm. The variety has shown resistance to leaf rusts, in particularly the seedling resistance to race 77-complex of leaf rust, stem rust, leaf blight, powdery mildew, flag smut and karnal bunt under both natural and artificial screening conditions. It has high protein content (12.9 %), better nutritional quality (Zinc 40.6 ppm, Iron 38.6 ppm) with good milling quality (Test weight 81.4 kg/hl) and best cooking quality for pasta product having highest overall acceptability 7.25. The newly developed durum wheat variety MACS 3949 released for cultivation at Peninsular Zone in India, which is having rich source of nutritional pasta quality with high zinc and iron content will be a promising one for future potential of export at international market.

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Resistance to aphids in synthetic hexaploid wheat derived lines

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Leonardo A. Crespo-Herrera CIMMYT
Ravi P Singh, Julio Huerta-Espino

Aphids are major pests of wheat, able to cause up to 40% yield reduction solely due to direct feeding and up to 60% when feeding is combined with the transmission of viral diseases. Wheat resistance to aphids has proven to be effective in protecting yields and also in reducing the transmission rate of viral diseases. Moreover, aphid resistance is fundamental to reduce the negative impacts that the indiscriminate use of insecticides have on the environment and human health. In this study we report the results derived from the evaluation of 326 synthetic hexaploid wheat (SHW) derived lines against the greenbug (Schizaphis graminum [Rondai]). Primary SHWs were crossed with CIMMYT elite lines and further selected in the breeding pipeline. Therefore, such lines have acceptable agronomic characteristics for its further use in breeding programs. The 326 SHW derived lines were evaluated at seedling stage, in five augmented incomplete blocks, arranged in split-plots, with two treatments (infested vs. non-infested) and with resistant and susceptible checks replicated 16 times. The measured variables were chlorophyll content with a SPAD meter and a visual damage score in a scale 0-100 was also taken. Measurements were recorded when the susceptible check was dead due to aphid feeding. The evaluations were repeated two times for confirmation. Our results indicate the presence of genetic variation for S. graminum resistance. We identified about 4 % of the lines to carry high levels of resistance against this aphid. These lines are currently used in CIMMYT's bread wheat breeding program to incorporate the resistance in elite germplasm.

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Three years of the Precision Wheat Phenotyping Platform for diseases in Uruguay: current status and future prospects

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Gustavo Azzimonti Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria (INIA), Estaci?n La Estanzuela, Ruta 50, Km 11, Colonia, Uruguay
Vanesa,Domeniguini, N?stor, Gonz?lez, Richard, Garcia, Carolina, Saint-Pierre, Pawan, Singh, Mart?n, Quincke, Silvia, Pereyra, Silvia, Germ?n, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Since 2014 CGIAR-WHEAT Program has promoted the establishment of a network of field-based Precision Wheat Phenotyping Platforms (PWPP) to expand the existing collaborations between CIMMYT, ICARDA and National Agricultural Research System partners. The main goals are improving the quality of data collected and shared among institutions to enhance and accelerate the international wheat breeding, and promote synergism with the private sector and nongovernmental organizations. In 2015, the PWPP-Uruguay was established to test genotypes for multiple diseases: leaf rust, Fusarium head blight and Septoria tritici blotch. These diseases are phenotyped each year in separate field trials artificially inoculated with pathogen isolates identified as representatives of the pathogen regional population. Wheat material is sowed in plots with susceptible checks every 50 entries. Disease severity and other variables related to the disease development are measured using standard international scales at dates when the expression of plant resistance is optimal. In the first three years of the platform, more than 1500 genotypes were screened per year. These materials had diverse origins (more than eight institutions, public and private, from eight countries) and diverse types: from recent commercialized to ancient cultivars, advanced lines, International CIMMYT nurseries, mapping populations or panels. Highly resistant genotypes to multiple diseases could be selected. At the present time, we are developing and adopting advanced phenotyping methods, combining remote sensing and image analysis, and exploring their adaptation to breeding constraints. Also, extension activities as internships, training courses and student projects are being developed. Major future prospects are the enhancement of data and germplasm exchange between platform partners and the PWPP network and the involvement in collaborative phenotyping/genotyping breeding projects.

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Molecular detection of adult plant leaf rust resistance gene Lr46 in durum wheat germplasm

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Reham Abo Al-Kanj Aleppo University
Mohammad Kassem, Ghinwa Lababedi, Naim Al-Husien

Leaf rust is the most common rust in wheat production areas of Syria and causes significant annual yield losses. Using genotypes with durable resistance is the most economical way of controlling the disease. One of the best-known leaf rust resistance genes is Lr46 that confers a slow rusting type of adult plant resistance. The main objective of this study was to identify Lr46 in durum wheat genotypes using morphological and molecular markers. Thirty-two durum wheat genotypes were evaluated for response to leaf rust at the seedling and adult plant stages. Twelve genotypes (37.5%) were resistant (R), 10 (31.25%) were moderately resistant (MR), seven (21.87%) were moderately susceptible (MS), and three (9.37%) were susceptible (S). Molecular marker analyses using SSR marker wmc44 showed that 16 genotypes (50%) carried Lr46/Yr29. The genotypes possessing the marker linked to Lr46/Yr29 could be used for selection of Lr46/Yr29 in breeding for slow rusting resistance in durum.

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Yellow rust disease status and pathogen population structure in Northwestern region of Pakistan

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Zia Rehman The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan
Muhammad Khan, Muhammad Imtiaz, Zahoor Swati, Annemarie Justesen, Sajid Ali

Yellow rust caused by Puccinia striiformis is an important disease in Pakistan. The population structure of P. striiformis in the North Eastern Himalayan region of Pakistan have been shown to be genotypically diverse with potential role of sexual recombination (Ali et al., 2014b), while lesser diversity in the Southern districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP)(Khan et al., 2015). This study was designed for the first time to assess disease status and analyze population structure of P. striiformis across three distant parts of Northwestern Pakistan i.e., Bajaur in North Western Agency and Swat and Buner in Malakand Agency, and was compared with other Pakistani populations. Depending on the intensity of infections caused by the pathogen in the tested varieties and breeding lines, the severity of the disease ranged from 5% to 100% during 2015. Yellow rust severity was the maximum on Morocco (100%), Gomal (100%) and KPWYT-18 (80%) and moderate on Ghanimat-e-IBGE (10%) and PS-2008, PS-2013, Tatara and Millat with 20% severity. A total of 81 single lesion samples collected on infected varieties were genotyped with 18 microsatellite markers. From these, 63 distinct multilocus genotypes (MLGs) were detected; 15 single lesion samples collected from Buner produced 15 distinct MLGs signifying very high diversity. A high genotypic diversity with clear signature of recombination was detected across all the three locations. Buner (100%) had the maximum diversity followed by Swat (97%) and Bajaur (91%). The observed diversity was almost equal to other Northeastern Himalayan populations of Pakistan, while it was high when compared to some southern populations of KP (genotypic diversity of 0.895) and other worldwide clonal populations (Ali et al., 2014a). The high diversity and recombinant population structure suggested potential role of sexual reproduction in these areas, which needs to be further explored to establish the origin of diverse virulence pattern in Pakistan.

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Status and strategies for averting the threat of yellow rust (Puccinia striiformis Westend.) in North Indian states

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
D. P. Singh ICAR-Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research
Sudheer Kumar, P.L. Kashyap, Gyanendra Pratap Singh

Yellow rust of wheat caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. is one of the important diseases of wheat in India. In north Indian states it spreads quite fast due to favourable temperature and moisture prevailing in these states during major part of crop growth (November-mid March). In spite of favourable weather, proactive survey and surveillance and advisories issued in time resulted successful management of yellow rust in India during past four decades. Even large scale cultivation of varieties like HD 2967 in about 12 million ha past two years did not result any losses. Three spots of initial foci near foot hills in Punjab have been identified and are monitored regularly. Any sign of yellow rust is controlled effectively with the foliar sprays of fungicides like propiconazole @ 0.1%. Use of mobiles phones and internet services is regularly done for transfer of information on wheat crop health and suggestions for proper management. Strategic planting and sowing of wheat in which newly released high yielding yellow rust varieties helped in reducing the yellow rust inculum build up. Regular monitoring of wheat health via weather forecasts take place after every fortnight from December to March. During 2016-17 crop season, yellow rust was effectively managed and its occurrence was delayed in Punjab, Haryana and Uttarakhand states. Two new pathotypes, 110S 119 and 110S 84 developed recently were used for evaluation of entries of wheat yield trials during 2016-17 at hot spot locations. The new varieties in pipe line of identification and release are tested against yellow rust. The most critical period for yellow rust management remained from December till mid February.

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The RES-WHEAT project: identification of resistance genes in durum wheat for an healthier and more sustainable agriculture

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Anna Maria Mastrangelo CREA-Research Centre for Cereal and Industrial Crops
Elisabetta Mazzucotelli, Oadi Matny, Antonietta Saccomanno, Raffaella Battaglia, Francesca Desiderio, Agata Gadaleta, Nicola Pecchioni, Pasquale De Vita, Giovanni Laido, Luigi Cattivelli, Brian Steffenson

The recent emergence of new widely virulent and aggressive strains of rusts (particularly stripe and stem rust) is threatening Italian durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum) production, especially under the trend of higher temperature and humidity. A big effort has been undertaken to explore the genetic variability for resistance to these fungal pathogens and discovering novel resistance genes. In particular, a wide set of tetraploid wheat lines was genotyped with several thousands of SNP markers and used for association mapping. This large collection consisted of a group of durum wheat cultivars, produced from the beginning of the last century up to now, a collection of wild emmer wheats (T. dicoccoides), and lines belonging to other wild and domesticated tetraploid subspecies, as a large untapped source of genetic diversity. In a tight cooperation with the University of Minnesota, this collection was evaluated for reaction to several races of stem and stripe rust pathogens in both controlled greenhouse and field conditions. Among the genotypes belonging to the collection are parents of segregating populations which were used for the validation of mapping results. Novel resistance loci were identified, that can be incorporated into new durum varieties through breeding programs. The QTLs found in this study, together with those available in literature, were projected to the recently sequenced durum wheat genome in order to define more precisely the chromosome regions and candidate genes involved in resistance to rusts. Lines which were resistant to multiple races of rust pathogens were also found among both T. dicoccoides and durum wheat cultivars as a source of resistance genes, whose cloning will be undertaken based on the results here obtained.
This study was supported by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, with the special grant RES-WHEAT.

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Rust on wheat in the Czech Republic

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Pavel Horcicka Research centre SELTON
Alena Hanzalova, Jaroslav Matyk, Pavel Bartos

In the Czech Republic all three rust species on wheat occur. Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina) can be found almost everywhere, and it can cause yield losses up to 40% mainly in warmer parts of the country in South Moravia.
Yellow rust, typical for cooler climate, occurred in relatively long time intervals. However in 2013 new pathotypes tolerating higher temperatures occurred and caused yield losses. In 2016 yellow rust incidence was lower, being still important in Moravia, where yellow rust occurred already in previous years.
Stem rust incidence was very rare in the last years. However in Germany, outbreaks and new pathotypes (e.g. Digalu) of stem rust in 2013 were recorded and comeback of stem rust to Central Europe can be expected.
Rust control consists of chemical control and especially of breeding for resistance, that aims at combined resistance to all three rusts. On the scale 9 high resistance, 1 high susceptibility average 4 year rating (2013-2016) of the tested cultivars was 6.4 for yellow rust, 5.7 for leaf rust and 6.2 for stem rust.
"Triple rust resistance" was recorded in spring wheat LOTTE and winter wheat line SG-S 1684 13, high resistance to yellow rust and stem rust in the cultivar Steffi. Resistance to all three rusts of 14 winter wheat cultivars and 12 breeding lines from the Plant Breeding Station-Stupice is summarized on separate tables and described in the text.

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Identification of a new leaf rust resistance gene originated from Ae. speltoides via introgression to bread wheat

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Jasline Deek Tel Aviv University
Assaf Distelfeld, Jacob Manisterski, Pnina Ben-Yehuda

Intensive breeding and replacement of traditional landraces by modern cultivars led to the narrowing of genetic variation in cultivated wheat. The most sustainable method for wheat improvement is utilization of genetic diversity from wheat wild relatives such as Aegilops speltoides that has a diversity of genes for resistance to leaf rust (LR). A high pairing-inducing Ae. speltoides strain collected from Israel was introgressed into T. turgidum subsp. durum var. landrace Nursi. The F1 plants were treated with colchicine to induce chromosome doubling. The resulting hexaploid plants were crossed to bread wheat cv. Beit-Lehem and F3 plants were backcrossed three times to bread wheat cv. Barnir. Each generation was selected for LR resistance to P. triticina isolate #1010 and five resistant wheat-Ae. speltoides introgression lines (ILs) designated DK1 to DK5 were selected. These Ae. speltoides ILs were genotyped using the 90K Infinium SNP assay and most of the polymorphic markers were mapped to chromosome 1B suggesting that the Ae. speltoides introgressions encompass most of this chromosome. To test if the newly identified gene is identical to Lr51, that was also introgressed from Ae. speltoides to chromosome 1B of bread wheat, the DK ILs were genotyped with the molecular marker AGA7 that was shown to be linked to Lr51. The Ae. speltoides AGA7 allele was absent in the DK ILs suggesting that these genotypes are not carrying the Lr51 introgression. Moreover, we performed an allelism test. Spring wheat cv. Kern harboring resistance gene Lr51 was crossed with DK2 and an F2 segregation ratio of 15R:1S was obtained, indicating that the resistance was conditioned by two independent dominant genes. Overall, our results suggest that DK2 carries a new leaf rust resistance gene from Ae. speltoides and this gene has potential for wheat improvement.

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Development of adapted wheat lines resistant to Ug99+ with combinations of Sr26, Sr32 and Sr39

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Silvina Baraibar Instituto Nacional de Investigaci?n Agropecuaria (INIA) La Estanzuela
Paula Silva, Clara Pritsch, Miguel Raffo, Silvia Pereyra, Silvia German

Wheat stem rust (SR), caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, (Pgt) is considered one of the most destructive diseases of the wheat crop. As Sr24 and Sr31 are the most widely used resistance genes in the Southern Cone of America, wheat crops in this region is under threat of SR outbreaks posed by the potential migration of virulent Pgt Ug99-lineage races (Ug99+). Efforts have to be made to develop adapted lines resistant to Ug99+. Genes Sr26, Sr32 and Sr39 are effective to both Ug99+ and local races of the pathogen. This work is aimed to pyramid two and three of the resistance genes in two locally adapted wheat cultivars (G?nesis 2375 and G?nesis 6.87). Donor lines of Sr26, Sr32 and Sr39 (developed by I. Dundas, University of Adelaide, Australia) and molecular markers Sr26#43, csSr32#1 and Sr39#22r (developed by R. Mago et al., University of Adelaide) were used. Lines with two-gene combinations were developed in two steps. First, tree-way crosses were made by crossing heterozygous F1 plants (derived from crossings donor lines) to either one of the two adapted wheat cultivars. Subsequently, tree-way F1 plants were genotyped and only those with two-gene combinations were backcrossed (BC) twice to the adapted cultivars. Among three-way F1 plants, two-genes combinations were confirmed for Sr26+Sr32 (8 out of 31), Sr26+Sr39 (2 of 115) and Sr32+Sr39 (26 out of 103). In the BC1F1 generation, Sr26+Sr32, Sr26+Sr39 and Sr32+Sr39 combinations corresponded with 9, 9 and 45 out of 99, 27 and 241 plants, respectively. In 2017, 1345 BC2F1 plants are being grown to obtain BC2F2. We plan to intercross plants with two-gene combinations to obtain lines with the three genes which will be used as sources of resistance to develop cultivars with presumably longer lasting resistance to wheat SR.

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