All BGRI Abstracts

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Effect of host vernalisation, temperature and plant growth stage on wheat and triticale susceptibility to Puccinia striiformis

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Julian Rodriguez-Algaba Aarhus University
Chris K. Sørensen, Rodrigo Labouriau, Annemarie Justesen, Mogens Hovmøller

Host vernalisation and temperature strongly affect the susceptibility of winter crops to pathogenic fungi. However, how the interaction of these environmental factors influence host susceptibility to Puccinia striiformis, the yellow (stripe) rust fungus, is poorly understood. An experimental system was developed to examine the effect of vernalisation, temperature regime (standard; 18 day/12 night °C and low; 12 day/6 night °C) and plant growth (seedling and adult plant stages) on changes in susceptibility of agronomically important winter wheat and triticale genotypes to P. striiformis races ('Warrior' and 'Kranich') highly predominant in several European countries. Host genotypes exposed to prolonged periods of low temperature, termed vernalisation, reduced disease susceptibility on specific winter host genotypes, although its effect differed considerably by the temperature regime and the P. striiformis race deployed. The influence of vernalisation on host susceptibility was more apparent at low temperature for the 'Warrior' race and at standard temperature for the 'Kranich' race. Triticale genotypes inoculated with the 'Kranich' race were particularly affected by the influence of vernalisation and temperature regime by displaying a shift towards reduced susceptibility at standard temperature. The effect of plant growth stage, i.e., vernalised seedlings versus adult plants, was most evident for the 'Warrior' race at standard temperature and at low temperature for the 'Kranich' race by revealing a lower infection type at the adult plant stage. The research findings presented here contributed to a better understanding of the role of environmental factors in host susceptibility. This, in fact, will aid in the development of more efficient early-warning systems and disease management strategies to the yellow rust fungus and in the decision making for the deployment of winter wheat and triticale genotypes.

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Enrichment of Indian wheat germplasm with stripe rust resistant genes

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Ravish Chatrath ICAR-Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research, Karnal
Satish Kumar, Ratan Tiwari, Gyanendra Pratap Singh

Stripe rust, is a major constraint to wheat production in the more than 12.8 m ha region of the Northern Hills and North Western Plains zones in India. The previously deployed resistance genes Yr9 and Yr27 are no longer effective. New sources of resistance (Yr5, Yr10, Yr15, Yr24) became available under the umbrella of an Indo-Australian collaborative project. A set of advanced backcross derivative lines out yielded the checks in preliminary evaluations and were promoted to station-level (16 lines) and national (5 lines) trials. A new cohort of resistance genes (Yr47, Yr51, Yr57) are now available and are being used in the breeding program. Resistance genes Yr17, Yr18, Yr31, Yr36, Yr40, Yr53, YrC591, and Yr70 are also being used. The recent progress in development of high yielding, stripe rust resistant lines will help to address future threats from stripe rust.

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Isolation of wheat Yr26 sheds new insights into wheat resistance to Puccinia striiformis infection

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Qingdong Zeng Northwest A&F University
Dejun Han, Jia Guo, Manuel Spannagl, Jianhui Wu, Aizhong Cao, Peidu Chen, IWGSC, Lili Huang, Jun Guo, Klaus Mayer, Zhensheng, Kang

Wheat cultivation in many regions faces threats by devastating fungal infections. However, wheat cultivar 92R137 shows resistance to Puccinia striiformis infection. To isolate the stripe rust resistance gene Yr26, an integrated transcriptomic and comparative genomics approach was undertaken. Near-isogenic lines of wheat (carrying Yr26 or not) infected with two Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) (Virulence or avirulence to Yr26) were analysed in a dual detailed time series RNA-seq study. The emerging IWGSC refseq v1.0 genome assembly sequence serves as a valuable template and was also used for comparative genomics studies of the gene candidate region with the genome sequences of close relatives and wheat progenitors. Using bulked segregant analysis (BSA) to identify polymorphic SNPs between parent and resistant DNA (R-bulk) and susceptible DNA (S-bulk), flanking markers for Yr26 were identified. These two markers were mapped to the Chinese spring reference genome sequence, spanning a region of about 250 kb. The synteny analysis of this candidate region in CS chr1B with chr1A, chr1D, Wild Emmer Wheat (Td_chr1A and Td_chr1B) and Barley (chr1H) identified three candidate Yr26 genes. To detect gene candidates a dual time series RNA-seq analysis was performed. Genes differently expressed between rust susceptible (NIL-S) host lines and rust resistant (NIL-R) lines, carrying the Yr26 candidate gene were analysed. Both lines were inoculated with Pst carrying different avirulence factors (Pst-CYR32 and Pst-V26), compatible or incompatible with the corresponding wheat lines. Differential gene expression analysis (DEG) between compatible and incompatible interaction revealed DEGs in the wheat genome and in the Pst genome. From a network analysis of both wheat and Pst genes, we inferred connected co-expressed modules. Resulting modules showed particular enrichments for disease resistance, defense response to fungus and cell wall components.

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Outbreak of Wheat Yellow Rust disease under Moroccan conditions during 2016-2017 cropping season

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Abdelhamid Ramdani Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique INRA Morocco
Kumarse Nazari, David Hodson, Tine Thach, Julian Rodriguez Algaba, Mogens Støvring Hovmøller

Wheat rusts, notably yellow rust, are amongst the most damaging diseases on wheat in Morocco. The objective of this survey was to assess the incidence and severity of wheat rust diseases across Morocco. The survey was carried out during April-May 2017 where growth stage of wheat ranged from anthesis to physiological maturity. The severity and response rating for the adult plant field reaction to rusts were based on the modified Cobb scale. A total of 117 bread wheat fields were inspected. The survey revealed that the most prevalent disease was yellow rust (96 out of 117 fields). Leaf rust, SLD (Septoria Like Diseases) and to some extent root rot complex were less prevalent. Leaf rust was only observed in 8 out of 117 inspected fields and exhibited low severity. Stem rust was observed in only one field. Following the drought of 2016, the 2017 growing season was an epidemic year for yellow rust in Morocco. It was detected across all regions and 50% of inspected fields were highly infected. Those that were lightly or not infected were sprayed with fungicides up to two times. Almost all commercial bread wheat cultivars in Morocco are highly susceptible to yellow rust. Appearance of new virulent races is leading to the breakdown of resistance in major cultivars e.g., Arrihan, which had very few pustules of yellow rust in 2013 was highly susceptible in the last three years. Samples of yellow rust from 2016 revealed a new virulent race in all samples, temporarily designated Pst (new) [virulence pattern: [Yr-,2,3,-,-,6,7,8,9,-,-,17,-,25,-,32,Sp,AvS,-]. Thirty-four samples submitted to GRRC in 2017 were all of the same genotype, identical to the new race already detected in 2016. The results demonstrate that surveillance and genotyping/race phenotyping of samples may be important for early-warning and anticipatory breeding strategies.

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Genetic characterization of wheat for adult plant response against rust infestation under water deficit conditions

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Rahil Shahzad Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad
Shakra Jamil

Different biotic and abiotic stresses are hampering wheat yield across different geographic regions. Among biotic stresses, wheat rusts are principal cause of yield reduction. Whereas among abiotic stresses, drought is the principle cause of reduction in growth and lowering yield potential. So developing rust resistance and drought tolerance in wheat germplasm is needed, which requires assessment of genetic potential of current cultivars against these stresses to identify variation among existing germplasm. Screening of genotypes under naturally prevailing races of rust species is the better and inexpensive approach. In the present study 65 genotypes including five checks (AARI-11, Chakwal- 50, Aas- 11, Morocco and Galaxy-13) were evaluated for adult plant response to wheat rusts and water deficit conditions. Experimental material was planted in four blocks each having new entries along with repetition of five checks in augmented design. Data was recorded on morphological traits including plant height, peduncle length, spike length, productive tillers per meter, flag leaf area, number of spikelet per spike, grains per spike, single head weight, 1000 grain weight, days to maturity and grain yield per acre. Significant variation was observed among genotypes for all the studied traits. On the basis of performance G39 and G36 were better than commercial drought check Chakwal-50 in almost all the traits. However rust screening under natural rust infestation revealed that although Morocco showed susceptible (S) response yet only six genotypes were susceptible to yellow rust whereas all others were resistant. In case of leaf rust 29 were completely resistance, 25 were moderately resistant, seven were moderately susceptible and only four were completely susceptible to currently active races of leaf rust. However, in the case of stem rust, 61 genotypes showed complete resistance to stem rust, two showed moderately resistance and two were moderately susceptible. Information obtained from this study would be favorable for breeding rust resistant and drought tolerant cultivars.

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Towards delivery of suitably high yielding, stable, and rust resistant wheat genotypes in the stem rust hotspots of Kenya

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Godwin Macharia Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization
Ruth Wanyera, Bernard Otukho, Bernice Waweru, Hellen Wairimu, Sridhar Bhavani

Emergence of Pgt race Ug99 and rapid proliferation of lineal highly virulent races imminently threaten Kenyan wheat. Devastating epidemics have led to huge losses among smallholder farmers who invariably are unable to spray appropriately and in situations where susceptible varieties are grown. To combat stem rust, the Kenya wheat improvement program seeks to release high yielding stable genotypes with suitable levels of disease resistance. Moreover, detection of genotypes that are adapted to rain-fed environments is an overarching objective. Six hundred and seventeen genotypes from various CIMMYT nurseries (PCBW, EPCBW, PCHPLUS, and 9th SRRSN) were selected based on plant type and reaction to stem rust at Njoro. The reconstituted nursery-KSRON, was sown in the main season of 2016 at Njoro and Timau for further evaluation. Forty red grained lines depicting R-MR infection types, severity of 30% or less, and average Thousand Kernel Weight of >40g were then selected to constitute a yield trial. At each of eight diverse environments, trials also comprising four commercial varieties as checks, were designed in RCBD, three replicates laid out in contiguous array of 8 rows x 10 m plots. Genotype (G), Environment (E) and GE interactions effects were estimated by fitting the AMMI model to yield data, supported by a biplot visualization of the results. Analysis revealed significant (P ?0.01) genotype (G), environment (E), and GE interactions. The first three principal components (PC) explained ~78% of the observed variation. Environment was the predominant source contributing over 85% to total sum of squares. The biplot pointed to at least four environments that were highly correlated. By classifying genotypes based on Shukla's stability variance and Kang's stability rating, six genotypes (R1402, R1411, R1424, R1481, R1484, and R1486) were deemed high yielding and stable, and thus suitable candidates for further testing through the release pipeline.

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Analysis of the resistance to Zymoseptoria tritici in a Tunisian durum wheat landraces

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Sonia Mihed Hamza-Ben Youssef National Institute of Agronomy of Tunisia, INAT
Maroua Ouaja, Hanen Sbei, Bochra Bahri

Septoria tritici blotch (STB) caused by the fungal pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola (anamorph: Zymoseptoria tritici) is one of the most important foliar diseases of durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum) in Tunisia. It attacks plants from seedling stages to maturity causing serious yield losses. Breeding for resistance to STB in durum wheat can provide an effective, economic and environmentally-safe strategy to reduce yield losses. However, this is hampered by lack of sources of resistance. In this context, a collection of 420 accessions of durum wheat from the National Bank of Gene (BNG) were evaluated for resistance to two virulent isolates of Z. tritici, namely TunBz-1 (across two environments) and TM220 (across one environment) under field conditions at three different development stages. The evaluation scale was ranged from 0% (immune plant) to 100% (100% of leave covered with symptoms). Three effects were studied on the collection: environmental effect E1-E2 (years 2016-2017), isolate effect I1-I2 (TunBz-1 and TM220) and physiological stage effect S1-S2 (seedling and adult). Results highlighted different sources of resistance between both seedling and adult stages. Moreover, 51 and 67 accessions have differential response to the two studied isolates respectively in seedling and adult stage. Furthermore, the Venn diagram has identified 23 accessions in the collection that are resistant to both isolates at both stages and that resistance was stable across environments. These accessions are located mainly in the center of Tunisia. Resistance to isolate TunBz-1 is expressed since seedling stage and there is stability of this resistance throughout the environments. The center of Tunisia seems to be a diversity center that includes different sources of resistance to STB. This collection could be the subject of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) as it presents different types of STB resistance categories that can be targeted via SNPs.

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Genetics of leaf rust and stripe rust resistance in spring wheat cultivar 'Kijil'

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Maricarmen Sandoval-Sánchez 1,3 Colegio de Postgraduados-Fitosanidad, Campus Montecillo, Texcoco, 56230, Estado de M?xico, M?xico
Julio Huerta-Espino, Ravi P. Singh, Caixia Lan, Sridhar Bhavani, Reyna I. Rojas-Martínez, Ignacio Benitez-Riquelme, Cristian Nava-Díaz, Mandeep Singh Randhawa

Leaf rust and stripe rust caused by the fungi Puccinia triticina and P. striiformis f. sp. tritici, respectively, are important diseases of wheat and represent a significant threat in most wheat producing regions worldwide. Growing resistant varieties and the identification and characterization of new sources of resistance are necessary to combat the threat from the evolving pathogen population. Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) line 'Kijil' developed at CIMMYT showed adult plant resistance (APR) to leaf rust (LR) and stripe rust (YR). The genetic basis of the resistance was investigated using 198 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from the cross of susceptible Apav#1 and resistant Kijil. Field phenotyping of parents and RILs were conducted at El Batón, Toluca and Ciudad Obregon, Mexico during 2016 and 2017. Pearson correlation coeffcients (P< 0.0001) were high for disease severities between two years of evaluations: LR (r= 0.90) and YR (r= 0.83). Correlations (r= 0.30-0.76) were also significant between LR and YR in all environments. Genetic analyses indicated that 3 to 5 genes of additive effects governed resistance to both rusts. RILs carrying the pleiotropic APR gene Lr46/Yr29/Sr58 showed 23 and 41% of disease severity for LR and YR respectively, whereas lines lacking it had 55 and 78% severities. RILs positive for Sr2/Yr30 showed 66% YR severity, whereas those negative displayed 78%. In addition, lines carrying the race-specific gene Yr17/Sr38 showed 28% YR severity in contrast to non-carriers that displayed 78% severity. We conclude that Kijil possesses a complex nature of resistance.

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Spike photosynthesis and its role in grain filling in Indian wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Chanderkant Chaudhary Department of Plant Molecular Biology, University of Delhi South Campus
Paramjit Khurana

The flag leaf and spike are the prime organs in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) which contribute majorly for spike photosynthesis and eventually aid in grain filling. In this study we have tried to elucidate the effect of abiotic stress on the grain filling and spike photosynthesis. In order to unravel the role of flag leaf, awn, and spike in wheat grain filling and spike photosynthesis, 1000-kernel weight were calculated after removing flag leaves, awns, and by shading the spike in four wheat genotypes (PBW343, C306, K7903, HD2329) for two seasons (2014-2015, 2015-2016). A significant decrease in the grain filling was observed for all the genotypes. These results indicate the role of these organs in spike photosynthesis. The role of the awn tissue was investigated in PBW343 for its role in spike photosynthesis during heat stress. Deep transcriptome sequencing of the awn tissue (PBW343) was performed and it revealed 147573 unigenes. Out of these, 394 genes were differentially expressed genes (DEGs). These DEGs constitutes 201 upregulated and 193 downregulated genes. Genes involved in photosynthesis (Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase B, NADH dehydrogenase, Fe-S protein2), membrane integrity (ATP-dependent zinc metalloprotease FTSH6), and ion channel transporters (two-pore potassium channel3) were prominently expressed. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis represents PSII associated light-harvesting complex II catabolism, chloroplast organization, photosynthesis light harvesting in photosystemI, ethylene biosynthesis, regulation of oxidoreductase activity, stomatal closure, chlorophyll biosynthesis categories, which are highly overrepresented under heat stress conditions. Therefore, utilizing the awn transcriptome information, Rubisco activase (RCA) gene was chosen for overexpression studies in wheat and rice with the aim to enhance the photosynthetic efficiency of the spike tissue leading to higher grain filling.

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Identifing candidate genes corresponding to Yr6 in wheat stripe rust by resequencing a population acquired from selfing an isola

BGRI 2018 Poster Abstract
Gangming Zhan State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas and College of Plant Protection, Northwest A&F University
Yuan Tian, Yan Meng, Hengbo Ma, Lili Huang, Zhensheng Kang

Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend f.sp. tritici, is currently one of the most prevalent and damaging disease on wheat. Up to now, some genes in wheat which are resistant to wheat stripe rust have been cloned, but little is known about the corresponding avirulence gene according to the gene-for-gene hypothesis. A population containing 118 progeny isolates population acquired by selfing an isolate, PL17-7, with virulence to Yr26 was derived. Seventy-two progeny isolates were different in genotype depending on 92 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The progeny population segregated for avirulence to Yr6 at one locus (3 avirulent :1 virulent ratio). The parental isolate and 72 of 118 progeny isolates were resequenced to find candidate avirulence genes corresponding to Yr6. Overall, 7.6 million reads per sample were obtained and mapped to the draft genome of a Chinese Pst isolate CY32. The median depth of coverage was 63.6 fold. For each isolate, between 97.6% and 98.1% of the sequence reads were mapped to the race CY32 genome, which covered between 87.3% and 95.4% of the reference genome bases. An average of 97357 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) per isolate was found, which covered 8.1% of the reference genome. Different SNPs and Indels were found when isolates virulent and avirulent to wheat cultivar containing Yr6 were grouped into two groups. Though screening discrepant SNP and indel in these two groups, candidate avirulence genes corresponding to Yr6 may be found.

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